How long does the patenting process take?

The United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) organizes applications filed according to various classifications, which are mainly based on the field or technology to which the invention pertains. Once the application is filed, the application typically waits in line for one year and a half before it is examined, depending on the classification of the invention.

Some classes of invention have more applications in line for examination than other classes, and thus examination of the applications falling into these classes may take longer. On average, the entire process (from filing of the application to the issuance of the patent) takes about three years. This should not be taken as a guarantee that a patent will issue from an application or that a particular event will occur within the time frame stated. The process is faster if you hire professionals such as InventHelp agency to help you out.

What happens after the patent application is filed?

Generally, the application is preliminarily examined for completeness. Once the application is considered complete by the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), the application waits in line to be examined for patentability. The application typically waits in line for one and a half years depending on the classification the application falls into. Thereafter, the application is examined for patentability.

If the examiner finds no prior art that discloses, suggests, or teaches the claimed invention, the examiner issues a “notice of allowance.” Otherwise, the examiner issues an “office action” with a detailed discussion of the rejection. The applicant usually has three months to respond, or six months if the applicant pays extension fees as was described in the article on http://baltimorepostexaminer.com/inventhelp-can-help-make-young-inventors-dreams-into-reality/2018/07/20 too.

However, other complicated events may occur. Plenty of strategies may be adopted in dealing with a decision from the Patent Office. It is best to consult a registered patent attorney who can lay out these strategies for you and lead you into the most efficient and economical direction.